Dealing With Seller’s Remorse?

    It is important to have an understanding of the emotional shift when a person finally decides to make a move.

    The Dawning of Regret

    For years you have been toying with the idea of moving out of the house and enjoying a newer home or perhaps a different kind of lifestyle. Finally, you make the move to interview agents, stage your home for better presentation, and get it on the market.

    The reality sets in as you pull in the driveway and are shocked to see a “for sale” sign in your own yard. Could this finally be happening? Confused, depressed and out of sorts, you sit yourself down to think this out a spell. “I can’t believe I want to leave my home, after all the years and memories that we have had here.” Yet you have discussed the move and made the decision, so why are you feeling so insecure?

    Congratulations on being totally normal. Although the anticipation of relocating to a new place in a new neighborhood is exciting, leaving behind your present comfort zone can make for emotional lows. Feeling a sense of loss and discomfort are normal reactions when families relocate to new surroundings.

     

    Dealing with Displacement

    Displacement is caused by upsetting the habitual places we have our things. Frustration and confusion mount when you are unable to perform daily tasks like finding the right frying pan when everything is differently arranged and in unfamiliar surroundings. Concerns about how you will find new places and streets may make you worry a little. Questions arise that you are making such an important investment and wondering if you have done the right thing.

    You understand on a conscious level that the home represents a product of inventory to the consumer, but it is sometimes difficult not to project your own emotional attachments and prejudices. Comments from the buying public are those made for a myriad of reasons, and should not cause insecurity and disappointment.

    One of the most common problems we have with sellers is their inability to disconnect from their own home to be objective. When other homes that are similar in style and age sell before theirs, they have difficulty understanding why the buyer chose the other property. The things that make your home attractive to you may not be appreciated or needed by the new buyer.

    Although “extras” do support a stronger price, these items will only be important to the buyer some of the time. Upgraded faucets or decking are nice to have, but generally won’t be the singular reason for a purchase. The buyers tend to buy when “feeling” right about a property and back the decision up later after making the emotional commitment first. The extra touches tend to reinforce the decision to purchase, rather than create the impulse to buy. Arguing that fencing and decking and other improvements should have made the difference in similar housing doesn’t make the buyer’s decision wrong, but right for them.

    The Power of Staging

    A good sales agent will help you “stage” your home for maximum appeal. This might require your packing up and be taking down photos, and mementos that you are quite used to seeing on a daily basis. Your home may appear stark and severe to you without these accents. Just remember that you must live in your home one way, but that you offer it as a product in quite another way.

    You can help make the moving transition more comfortable by keeping your focus on your new home. Get familiar with the new area by meeting some of the neighbors before moving in. Familiarize yourself with the new streets and shopping areas so that you won’t feel lost and uncertain. If the area is quite a distance from your present home, have the agent take some photos of the new schools for the kids and some good photos of your new home to keep you focused. Give yourself a few days to settle in after the move, relax and enjoy your new home.

    WRITTEN BY

    Trackback from your site.

    Leave a Reply